The Ole Ball Game

is the pitcher condsidered an infielder ?

Photo Bill Stanton:  Checkswing.com

Photo Bill Stanton: Checkswing.com

Anonymous asked: Ground ball hit to but not fielded (untouched) by the pitcher and then hits the runner is the pitcher considered an infielder if so is the runner called out?


Rick answered: In the situation you described, for purposes of sorting out that particular scenario, the pitcher is considered a pitcher, not an infielder. The runner is out, the ball is immediately dead.

The rule is: any runner is out when he is contactedby a fair batted ball before it touches an infielder, or after it passes any infielder, except the pitcher, and the umpire is convinced that another infielder has a play.

Pitchers become infielders in certain situations. Runners on base, pitcher steps on the rubber to get his sign and prepare to throw a pitch. He clearly steps back off the rubber with his pivot foot, immediately becoming an infielder, not a pitcher.

Thank you for your question!

Yours in baseball,

Rick

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Aug 15, 2016
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Is the pitcher considered and infielder?
by: Anonymous

Once more I think I've got it right this time in regards to the Dayton Dragons Umpire double play.

The rule differs depending on whether the ball touches the pitcher or merely passes him.

Rule 5.09(f) it is umpire interference when "A fair ball touches ... an umpire on fair territory before it touches an infielder including the pitcher
or
touches an umpire before it has passed an infielder other than the pitcher"

Aug 15, 2016
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Is the epitcher considered and infielder?
by: Anonymous

Rule 5.09(f) specifies when umpire interference occurs, as it relates to a batted ball:

A fair ball touches a runner or an umpire on fair territory before it touches an infielder including the pitcher, or touches an umpire before it has passed an infielder other than the pitcher; runners advance, if forced. Rule 5.09(f) Comment: If a fair ball touches an umpire working in the infield after it has bounded past, or over, the pitcher, it is a dead ball.

The Dayton Dragons game should have stopped play. The umpire erred in this.

Aug 15, 2016
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Is the pitcher considered an infielder?
by: Anonymous

On umpire interference the rule specifically states the pitcher is no an umpire.

Rule 5.09(f) specifies when umpire interference occurs, as it relates to a batted ball:

A fair ball touches a runner or an umpire on fair territory before it touches an infielder including the pitcher, or touches an umpire before it has passed an infielder other than the pitcher; runners advance, if forced. Rule 5.09(f) Comment: If a fair ball touches an umpire working in the infield after it has bounded past, or over, the pitcher, it is a dead ball.

Aug 15, 2016
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Is the epitcher considered and infielder?
by: Anonymous

I believe the rule you sited does not clear this up. True it only mentions the infielders however the question at hand is "Is the pitcher considered an infielder" At a recent Dayton Dragons minor league game - August 12, 2016 - the batted ball hit off the pitcher then hit off the umpire and one-hopped to the shortstop covering second base to start the double play. Was the umpire wrong in this? I thought so until I saw this post. I guess my question is where in the rules does it specifically define pitcher as an infielder or not an infielder? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDzD5JO2hP8

Jan 31, 2012
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That's incorrect.
by: Anonymous

Rule 7.08f states: "He is touched by a fair ball in fair territory before the ball has touched or passed an
infielder. The ball is dead and no runner may score, nor runners advance, except
runners forced to advance. EXCEPTION: If a runner is touching his base when
touched by an Infield Fly, he is not out, although the batter is out;"

The pitcher is NOT mentioned here, as you stated.

Jun 07, 2011
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PITCHER
by: Anonymous

Got it Thanks I thought I new the rule as you stated but sometimes when things happen fast later you start thinking am I sure

Jun 06, 2011
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pitcher/ infielder
by: Anonymous

Anonymous commented: So now that you have defined the pitcher as not an infielder what would the ruling be if the pitcher touches the ball and then it hits the runner?

Rick answered: The rule covering this situation is 7.09 (k): Any runner is out when: A fair ball touches him on fair territory before touching a fielder. If a fair ball goes through, or by, an infielder, and touches a runner immediately back of him, or touches the runner after having been deflected by a fielder, the umpire shall not declare the runner out for being touched by a batted ball. In making such a decision the umpire must be convinced that the ball passed through, or by, the fielder and that no other infielder had the chance to make a play on the ball. If in the judgement of the umpire, the runner deliberately and intentionally kicks such a batted ball on which the infielder has missed a play, then the runner shall be called out for interference.

Penalty for interference: Runner is out, ball is dead.

The pitcher has become a fielder as soon as he releases the baseball on the pitch, and his pivot foot comes off the rubber. When he fails to touch the ball in the first scenario, he is considered the pitcher for point of reference on the rest of the play.

When he touches the ball, and the ball hits the runner, it is no longer a batted ball; but a deflected ball, thus not an out.

Yours in baseball,

Rick

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